Power Affects Perceived Time Available (#235)

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How to Cite this Report

APA Style

Ryan J. McCarty, Samantha Jordan, Megan Turner, Lawton K. Swan. Power Affects Perceived Time Available. (2016, January 24). Retrieved 08:32, March 25, 2017 from http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjM1

MLA Style

"Power Affects Perceived Time Available" Ryan J. McCarty, Samantha Jordan, Megan Turner, Lawton K. Swan. 24 Jan 2016 22:23 25 Mar 2017, 08:32 <http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjM1>

MHRA Style

'Power Affects Perceived Time Available', Ryan J. McCarty, Samantha Jordan, Megan Turner, Lawton K. Swan, , 24 January 2016 22:23 <http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjM1> [accessed 25 March 2017]

Chicago Style

"Power Affects Perceived Time Available", Ryan J. McCarty, Samantha Jordan, Megan Turner, Lawton K. Swan, , http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjM1 (accessed March 25, 2017)

CBE/CSE Style

Power Affects Perceived Time Available [Internet]. Ryan J. McCarty, Samantha Jordan, Megan Turner, Lawton K. Swan; 2016 Jan 24, 22:23 [cited 2017 Mar 25]. Available from: http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjM1

Reference to Original Report of Finding Moon, A., & Chen, S. (2014). The power to control time: Power influences how much time (you think) you have. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 54, 97-101.
Title Power Affects Perceived Time Available
If the original article contained multiple experiments, which one did you attempt to replicate? e.g., you might respond 'Study 1' or 'Experiment 4'. Study 3
Link to PDF of Original ReportView Article
Brief Statement of Original Result Individuals in positions of high power perceive themselves as having more time available than those in lower power positions due to differences in perceived control over time.
Type of Replication Attempted Fairly Direct Replication
Result Type Successful Replication
Difference? Same Direction, .047
Number of Subjects 188
Number of Subjects in Original Study 103
Year in which Replication Attempt was Made 2014
Name of Investigators (Real Names Required) Ryan J. McCarty, Samantha Jordan, Megan Turner, Lawton K. Swan
Detailed Description of Method/Results In accordance with the original study, we hypothesized that individuals who imagined themselves in a position of high power would perceive having more time available, which would be mediated by an increase in perceived control over time.

We utilized Amazon’s Mechanical Turk to recruit 188 individuals to partake in an online survey. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: a high power condition or a low power condition.

In the high power condition, participants were instructed to imagine themselves interviewing a potential employee for a position on their team, with the ability to choose what questions to ask and the decision to hire or not. An image of an executive office scene--a desk with an executive chair behind a desk and a smaller chair in front of the desk--was provided with instructions to visualize being the person in one of two chairs. In the high power condition, an arrow pointed from the chair behind the desk to the chair in front of the desk.

In the low power condition, participants were instructed to imagine themselves being interviewed by a potential employer, with the knowledge that the employer can ask any question and is the one who makes the decision of whether or not to hire. Low power participants saw the same image as high power participants, except the arrow pointed toward the smaller chair in front of the desk.

An attention check for the visualization task instructions followed (with failures being removed prior to analyses) in addition to a manipulation check, which asked participants to rate the phrase “I feel like I have a great deal of power” on a 1 – 5 Likert scale ( 1 strongly disagree – 5 strongly agree).

Participants then completed the five item Perceived Control Over Time Scale (Macan, 1994). On a 1-10 (1 strongly disagree – 10 strongly agree) Likert scale, participants rated how much they agreed with statements such as “I feel in control over my time” and “I must spend a lot of my time on unimportant tasks." Next, participants completed a seven item scale created by the target article's authors in order to assess perceived time available. On a 7-point scale (1 strongly disagree – 7 strongly agree), participants rated how much they agreed with the following statements: “I feel like most of my life lies ahead of me,” “I feel like there is plenty of time left in my life to make new plans,” “I have the sense that time is running out” (reverse-scored), “My future seems infinite to me,” “Time is expanded,” “Time is slipping away” (reverse-scored) and “I have a lot of time in which to get things done.” Lastly, participants filled out a demographics questionnaire.

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On the manipulation check, participants in the high power condition reported that they felt more power (M = 4.22, SD = 0.81) than those in the low power condition (M = 2.43, SD = 0.95), t(180.27) = 13.8, p = .000, d = 2.03. In addition, high power participants felt that they had more time (M = 28.6, SD = 7.80) than those in the low power condition (M = 26.1, SD = 8.63), t(182) = 2.004, p = .047, d = 0.30. However, there was no significant difference between the two groups in perceived control over time t(184) = -0.879, p = .381. It is important to note that in this study, the Perceived Control Over Time Scale was found to have an Cronbach’s α of 0.482. (The perceived time scale had α = 0.856.)

Any Known Methodological Differences
(between original and present study)?
In the original study, the authors found that perceived control over time meditated perceived time available. We did not test for mediation in our study because the perceived control over time scale did not demonstrate acceptable internal consistency reliability.
Email of Investigator
Name of individuals who
actually carried out the project
Samantha Jordan and Megan Turner, under supervision of Lawton K Swan.
Location of ProjectN/A (MTurk)
Characteristics of Subjects
(subject pool, paid, etc.)
Adults tested through internet
Mechanical Turk Workers
Where did these subjects reside?United States
Was this a Class Project?Yes
Further Details of Results as pdf
Additional Comments
Email of Original Investigator
Quantitive Information
I have complied with ethical standards for experimentation on human beings and, if necessary, have obtained appropriate permission from an Institutional Review Board or other oversight group.
TAG: Attention TAG: JDM TAG: Language TAG: Learning TAG: Memory TAG: Perception TAG: Performance TAG: Problem Solving TAG: Social Cognition TAG: Social Psychology TAG: Thinking

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