Replication of Mistakenly Seeking Solitude (#224)

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How to Cite this Report

APA Style

Julie Baumann, Elizabeth M. Delong, R. Joelle Griffiths, Colton Groh, Jakob Hull, Mariah Klanchar, Meranda Mayshark, Kendall McCrary, Carolyn McGhee, Madison Suhr, Madeline Tate, Alyssa Turner, and Bogdan Kostic. Replication of Mistakenly Seeking Solitude. (2015, May 12). Retrieved 19:27, April 27, 2017 from http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjI0

MLA Style

"Replication of Mistakenly Seeking Solitude" Julie Baumann, Elizabeth M. Delong, R. Joelle Griffiths, Colton Groh, Jakob Hull, Mariah Klanchar, Meranda Mayshark, Kendall McCrary, Carolyn McGhee, Madison Suhr, Madeline Tate, Alyssa Turner, and Bogdan Kostic. 12 May 2015 14:09 27 Apr 2017, 19:27 <http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjI0>

MHRA Style

'Replication of Mistakenly Seeking Solitude', Julie Baumann, Elizabeth M. Delong, R. Joelle Griffiths, Colton Groh, Jakob Hull, Mariah Klanchar, Meranda Mayshark, Kendall McCrary, Carolyn McGhee, Madison Suhr, Madeline Tate, Alyssa Turner, and Bogdan Kostic, , 12 May 2015 14:09 <http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjI0> [accessed 27 April 2017]

Chicago Style

"Replication of Mistakenly Seeking Solitude", Julie Baumann, Elizabeth M. Delong, R. Joelle Griffiths, Colton Groh, Jakob Hull, Mariah Klanchar, Meranda Mayshark, Kendall McCrary, Carolyn McGhee, Madison Suhr, Madeline Tate, Alyssa Turner, and Bogdan Kostic, , http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjI0 (accessed April 27, 2017)

CBE/CSE Style

Replication of Mistakenly Seeking Solitude [Internet]. Julie Baumann, Elizabeth M. Delong, R. Joelle Griffiths, Colton Groh, Jakob Hull, Mariah Klanchar, Meranda Mayshark, Kendall McCrary, Carolyn McGhee, Madison Suhr, Madeline Tate, Alyssa Turner, and Bogdan Kostic; 2015 May 12, 14:09 [cited 2017 Apr 27]. Available from: http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MjI0

Reference to Original Report of Finding Epley, N., & Schroeder, J. (2014). Mistakenly seeking solitude. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143, 1980-1999.
Title Replication of Mistakenly Seeking Solitude
If the original article contained multiple experiments, which one did you attempt to replicate? e.g., you might respond 'Study 1' or 'Experiment 4'. Experiment 1
Link to PDF of Original Report
Brief Statement of Original Result The original results reported that people predict a preference for solitude over interaction in public settings, but when people actually engage in conversation with strangers during public transportation they report more positive experiences with social interactions than with solitude.
Type of Replication Attempted Conceptual Replication
Result Type Successful Replication
Difference? Same Direction, .0007
Number of Subjects 50
Number of Subjects in Original Study 97
Year in which Replication Attempt was Made 2015
Name of Investigators (Real Names Required) Julie Baumann, Elizabeth M. Delong, R. Joelle Griffiths, Colton Groh, Jakob Hull, Mariah Klanchar, Meranda Mayshark, Kendall McCrary, Carolyn McGhee, Madison Suhr, Madeline Tate, Alyssa Turner, and Bogdan Kostic
Detailed Description of Method/Results Undergraduate Experimental Psychology students at Missouri State University were instructed by their professor, Dr. Kostic, to fill out a brief questionnaire about whether they would talk to friends on a bus, talk to strangers on a bus, or sit quietly, and how much they would enjoy each scenario. Results strongly showed that participants would rather talk to a friend than sit alone, but would rather sit alone than talk to a stranger, and that riding in silence would be about as enjoyable as talking to a stranger. These same students were then enlisted as research assistants (RAs) to ride the university shuttle around campus and administer questionnaires to other passengers. Each RA was instructed to ride the shuttle and select four individuals (one at a time) to engage in either a standardized conversation or sit quietly beside. Half the time, RAs would have a conversation with another passenger. The other half the time the RAs would sit quietly next to another passenger. In both conditions, the RAs then asked the passenger to fill out a short questionnaire measuring levels of happiness (0 = not happy at all, 6 = very happy), sadness (0 = not sad at all, 6 = very sad), pleasantness (-3 = much less pleasant, 3 = much more pleasant), and feelings of productivity (-3 = much less productive, 3 = much more productive). RAs then debriefed the passengers and handed them slip of paper with contact information for the instructor.

Responses were used to compute a standardized positivity index (following the same method as the original study) and the mean positivity scores from each condition were compared using an independent-samples t-test. Results showed that passengers in the Conversation condition (M = .37, SD = .58) reported a higher overall rating of the experience than passengers in the Quiet condition (M = -.37, SD = .83), t(48) = 3.62, p < .01.
Any Known Methodological Differences
(between original and present study)?
The methods in the present study were slightly different from the original. In the original study participants were instructed to engage in conversation or not with other passengers before the participants themselves filled out the questionnaires. In the current study the research assistants were instructed to engage in conversation or not with other passengers, and then the passengers filled out the questionnaires. RAs were not blind to the hypothesis. Also, the original study was conducted on commuter trains with participants engaging in unstructured conversation. The current experiment was conducted a campus shuttle, and the conversations with the other passengers were standardized.
Email of Investigator
Name of individuals who
actually carried out the project
Students in Dr. Kostic's experimental psychology class collected the data and Dr. Kostic conducted the analyses.
Location of ProjectMissouri State University campus
Characteristics of Subjects
(subject pool, paid, etc.)
Other
The participants were commuters on the university shuttle service who participated without compensation.
Where did these subjects reside?United States
Was this a Class Project?Yes
Further Details of Results as pdf
Additional Comments
Email of Original Investigator
Quantitive Information
I have complied with ethical standards for experimentation on human beings and, if necessary, have obtained appropriate permission from an Institutional Review Board or other oversight group.
TAG: Attention TAG: JDM TAG: Language TAG: Learning TAG: Memory TAG: Perception TAG: Performance TAG: Problem Solving TAG: Social Cognition TAG: Social Psychology TAG: Thinking

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