Higher SES predicts unethical behavior in men (#150)

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APA Style

Lauren Konigsberg, Sydney MacGregor, Matthew Johnson, Alexander Massey, and Kimberly Daubman. Higher SES predicts unethical behavior in men. (2013, February 23). Retrieved 19:03, February 25, 2017 from http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MTUw

MLA Style

"Higher SES predicts unethical behavior in men" Lauren Konigsberg, Sydney MacGregor, Matthew Johnson, Alexander Massey, and Kimberly Daubman. 23 Feb 2013 13:44 25 Feb 2017, 19:03 <http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MTUw>

MHRA Style

'Higher SES predicts unethical behavior in men', Lauren Konigsberg, Sydney MacGregor, Matthew Johnson, Alexander Massey, and Kimberly Daubman, , 23 February 2013 13:44 <http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MTUw> [accessed 25 February 2017]

Chicago Style

"Higher SES predicts unethical behavior in men", Lauren Konigsberg, Sydney MacGregor, Matthew Johnson, Alexander Massey, and Kimberly Daubman, , http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MTUw (accessed February 25, 2017)

CBE/CSE Style

Higher SES predicts unethical behavior in men [Internet]. Lauren Konigsberg, Sydney MacGregor, Matthew Johnson, Alexander Massey, and Kimberly Daubman; 2013 Feb 23, 13:44 [cited 2017 Feb 25]. Available from: http://www.PsychFileDrawer.org/replication.php?attempt=MTUw

Reference to Original Report of Finding Piff, P. K., Stancato, D. M., Cote, S., Mendoza-Denton, R., & Keltner, D. (2012). Higher social class predicts increased unethical behavior. PNAS, 109 (11), 4086-4091.
Title Higher SES predicts unethical behavior in men
If the original article contained multiple experiments, which one did you attempt to replicate? e.g., you might respond 'Study 1' or 'Experiment 4'. Study 3
Link to PDF of Original ReportView Article
Brief Statement of Original Result Higher SES predicted more unethical decision making after controlling for ethnicity, sex, and age.
Type of Replication Attempted Fairly Direct Replication
Result Type Successful Replication
Difference? Same Direction, .02
Number of Subjects 80
Number of Subjects in Original Study 105
Year in which Replication Attempt was Made 2013
Name of Investigators (Real Names Required) Lauren Konigsberg, Sydney MacGregor, Matthew Johnson, Alexander Massey, and Kimberly Daubman
Detailed Description of Method/Results Student researchers approached 80 undergraduate students (29 female) at various public locations on campus and asked them to participate in a study on ethical decision making. Participants first read the same eight scenarios used in the original study. Each scenario described a situation in which the protagonist behaved in an unethical manner. Participants were asked to indicate how likely (1=not very likely, 7=very likely) they would behave in the same way. Next, participants reported their socio-economic status using the MacArthur subjective SES ladder where higher rungs indicated higher SES and lower rungs indicated lower SES. The eight scenarios had good internal reliability (Cronbach’s alpha=.77) and so participants’ scores were averaged. SES was found to be significantly related to the likelihood of behaving unethically, r(79)=.24, p<.02 (one-tailed). When correlations were run separately for males and females, only the correlation for males was significant, r(50)=.31, p<.02. The correlation for females was not significant, r(28)=.15, p>.20 (one-tailed).
Any Known Methodological Differences
(between original and present study)?
The original study had participants that were more ethnically and socioeconomically diverse. Most of our participants were Caucasian and of higher socioeconomic status. In addition, the original study’s participants completed their surveys at individual computer terminals. Our participants took surveys with paper and pencil.
Email of Investigator
Name of individuals who
actually carried out the project
Lauren Konigsberg, Sydney MacGregor, Matthew Johnson and Alexander Massey ran subjects and analyzed the data under the supervision of Kimberly Daubman
Location of ProjectVarious public locations around Bucknell University campus.
Characteristics of Subjects
(subject pool, paid, etc.)
Other
Undergraduate students who were not paid or were not part of the General Psychology subject pool.
Where did these subjects reside?United States
Was this a Class Project?Yes
Further Details of Results as pdf
Additional Comments
Email of Original Investigator
Quantitive Information The original study found a significant correlation regardless of gender (r=.23). Our study found a similar correlation (r=.24) but when we analyzed separately for males and females, we found a signif
I have complied with ethical standards for experimentation on human beings and, if necessary, have obtained appropriate permission from an Institutional Review Board or other oversight group.
TAG: Attention TAG: JDM TAG: Language TAG: Learning TAG: Memory TAG: Perception TAG: Performance TAG: Problem Solving TAG: Social Cognition TAG: Social Psychology TAG: Thinking

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